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Pinocchio promises the Fairy to be good and to study, as he is growing tired of being a Marionette, and wishes to become a real boy

Pinocchio promises the Fairy to be good and to study,
as he is growing tired of being a Marionette,
and wishes to become a real boy


Chapter Twenty-five

As retold for Aaron

Pinocchio promises the Fairy to be good and to study, as he is growing tired of being a Marionette, and wishes to become a real boy.

If Pinocchio cried much longer, the little woman thought he would melt away. Finally, she said, "Yes, Pinocchio, I am she. But how did you know?" she asked, laughing.
"My love for you told me who you were."
"Pinocchio, do you remember? You left me when I was a young maiden, and now you find me a grown woman. Now, I'm old and tall enough to be your mother."
"That is good with me, because I have wanted a mother just like other little boys have. But look at me, I haven't grown a bit. Why is that?"
"But you can't grow, Pinocchio," answered the Fairy.
"Why not?"
"Because Marionettes never grow. They are born Marionettes, they live Marionettes, and they die Marionettes. That is how it is."
"Oh, I'm tired of always being a Marionette!" cried Pinocchio, disgusted. "It's about time for me to grow as everyone else does. I want to be a real person rather than a wooden boy."
"And you will if you deserve it--"
"Really?" Pinocchio exclaimed. "Tell me, what can I do to deserve it?"
"First one must act like a well-behaved child."
"Then, I promise, from now on I'll be different," said Pinocchio. "I want nothing more than to be a good boy and a comfort to my Father. I wonder if I will ever be lucky enough to find him and embrace him once more."
"I think so.' The Fairy smiled. "Indeed, I am sure of it."
At this answer, Pinocchio's happily grasped the Fairy's hands and kissed them so hard that it appeared as if he had lost his head. Then lifting his face, he looked at her lovingly and asked, "Tell me, Mother, did I cause you too much sorrow when I didn't return? I know that when I found the house in the wood gone, and you not to be found, I was so overcome with despair I felt I might die."
"I know it, for you have a kind and generous heart, Pinocchio. This is the reason why I have come so far to look for you."
"You came looking for me?"
"Certainly. I had to find my son."
"Oh! I am so happy!" cried Pinocchio, laying his head on the Fairy's hands. "I promise I will obey you always and do everything you wish. After all, the life of a Marionette has grown very tiresome to me and I want to become a boy, no matter how hard it is. You promise that, do you not? I can become a little boy one day and quit being a pitiful Marionette?"
"Yes, I promise, and now it is up to you," the Fairy said.

Click on Pinocchio to go to Chapter Twenty-six
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Rewritten by J. Kearns (in some places considerably, in other places not so considerably, and in others not much at all) from the translation by Carol Della Chiesa of C. Collodi's original story
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